Robert browning worldview truth is within ourselves

He had a School of Magnetism some three hundred years before Mesmer appeared upon the scene. When this form has issued from the womb of Nature, one stage of being is complete, one scheme of evolution wound up. At first he scarcely hears it, so softly does it whisper.

I knew, I felt, perception unexpressed, Uncomprehended by our narrow thought, But somehow felt and known in every shift And change in the spirit,—nay, in every pore Of the body, even, —what God is, what we are What life is—how God tastes an infinite joy In infinite ways—one everlasting bliss, From whom all being emanates, all power Proceeds; in whom is life for evermore, Yet whom existence in its lowest form Includes; where dwells enjoyment there is he: But spring-wind, like a dancing psaltress, passes Over its breast to waken it, rare verdure Buds tenderly upon rough banks, between The withered tree-roots and the cracks of frost, Like a smile striving with a wrinkled face; The grass grows bright, the boughs are swoln with blooms Like chrysalids impatient for the air, The shining dorrs are busy, beetles run Along the furrows, ants make their ade; Above, birds fly in merry flocks, the lark Soars up and up, shivering for very joy; Afar the ocean sleeps; white fishing-gulls Flit where the strand is purple with its tribe Of nested limpets; savage creatures seek Their loves in wood and plain—and God renews His ancient rapture.

With still a flying point of bliss remote, A happiness in store afar, a sphere Of distant glory in full view; thus climbs Pleasure its heights for ever and for ever. Paracelsus spoke to him in the universal language of symbols, and in recreating the character Browning used the same tongue.

From ‘paracelsus’ - Poem by Robert Browning

Clogged by the weeds of superstition, credulity and blind belief, dammed by the rocks of materialism and selfishness, they have become little more than stagnant pools, poisonous to the man who stops to quench his thirst.

A baffling and perverting carnal mesh Binds it, and makes all error: For Browning knew -- as every Theosophist knows -- that Paracelsus was the greatest Occultist of the Middle Ages, and that his wanderings were instigated by the same motive that prompted H.

II I knew, I felt, perception unexpressed, Uncomprehended by our narrow thought, But somehow felt and known in every shift And change in the spirit,—nay, in every pore Of the body, even, —what God is, what we are What life is—how God tastes an infinite joy In infinite ways—one everlasting bliss, From whom all being emanates, all power Proceeds; in whom is life for evermore, Yet whom existence in its lowest form Includes; where dwells enjoyment there is he: They are so simple, he says being mainly of the overturning sort that anyone can understandand apply them.

To the Theosophist his name means much more than that. Then all is still; earth is a wintry clod: It filters through his lines with a subtle insistence, illumining his words with a light never born from human brain and emboldening his readers to True Occultism -- Atma-Vidya -- is the highest form of spiritual knowledge, while the Occult Arts deal with the lower, material side of Nature.

Those "wanderers" who, like Paracelsus, are seeking the ocean of knowledge, have no time for dallying at these pools. But spring-wind, like a dancing psaltress, passes Over its breast to waken it, rare verdure Buds tenderly upon rough banks, between The withered tree-roots and the cracks of frost, Like a smile striving with a wrinkled face; The grass grows bright, the boughs are swoln with blooms Like chrysalids impatient for the air, The shining dorrs are busy, beetles run Along the furrows, ants make their ade; Above, birds fly in merry flocks, the lark Soars up and up, shivering for very joy; Afar the ocean sleeps; white fishing-gulls Flit where the strand is purple with its tribe Of nested limpets; savage creatures seek Their loves in wood and plain—and God renews His ancient rapture.

He used electro-magnetism as a healing agency three hundred years before its so-called discoverer, Dr. The fruits of the latter held little lure for Paracelsus, for he said: In the wanderings of Paracelsus he found footprints which every seeker after truth could follow, and in the experiments of the great alchemist a symbolic outline of the method whereby the baser metals of the lower, personal desires might be transmuted into the pure gold of altruistic service.

With still a flying point of bliss remote, A happiness in store afar, a sphere Of distant glory in full view; thus climbs Pleasure its heights for ever and for ever.

He re-discovered Hydrogen, the germ-theory of disease, and the occult properties of the magnet -- that "bone of Horus" which played such an important part in the theurgic mysteries twelve centuries before.

His artistic energy was not expended in recreating the historical figure of a renowned scientist, traveller and teacher, but in giving tangible shape and form to the inner experiences and spiritual flights of one who dared to know, to aspire and to keep silent.

It is said that in the ancient and prehistoric days the whole earth was nourished by the pure and uncontaminated waters that flowed from this primal Source. His very choice of Paracelsus as the subject of his first important literary effort shows the mystical trend of his youthful mind, while his approach to the subject is a further indication of his deep interest in the hidden side of Nature and the psychic and spiritual powers latent in man.

When Paracelsus was questioned about the necessity for his contemplated journey, he replied: The first thing to be overturned by an application of these "prime principles" is the idea of a personal God. There is an inmost centre in us all, Where truth abides in fullness; and around, Wall upon wall, the gross flesh hems it in, This perfect, clear perception—which is truth.

It recalls the individual who was the link between the science of the ancients and what is now miscalled modern science. A baffling and perverting carnal mesh Binds it, and makes all error: With the dawning of self-consciousness in man, a two-fold duty is assumed: For it is the voice of the Ego Sum, the Immortal Entity, and it impels him to retreat within the silent sanctuary of his own heart to find the truth he seeks.

Then all is still; earth is a wintry clod:I TRUTH is within ourselves; it takes no rise From outward things, whate’er you may believe.

There is an inmost centre in us all, Where truth abides in fullness; and around, Wall upon wall, the gross flesh hems it in, This perfect, clear perception—which is truth.

Paracelsus Robert Browning Full view - Paracelsus Page 36 - Truth is within ourselves ; it takes no rise From outward things, whate'er you may believe. There is an inmost centre in us all, Where truth abides in fulness ; and around, Wall upon wall, the gross flesh hems it in, This perfect, clear perception— which is truth.

5/5(2). Browning's early career began promisingly. The fragment from his intended long poem Pauline brought him to the attention of Dante Gabriel Rossetti, and was followed by Paracelsus, which was praised by both William Wordsworth and Charles Dickens.

From ‘paracelsus’ by Robert Browning. I TRUTH is within ourselves it takes no rise From outward things whateer you may believe. There is an inmost centre in /5(2).

From ‘Paracelsus'

Browning's interest in Paracelsus was not centered in the father of modern chemistry, but in the seeker after eternal wisdom. Robert Browning Worldview Truth Is Within Ourselves Gabrielle Stith Denton English May 13, Robert Browning and the Dramatic Monologue Controlling Purpose: to analyze selected works of Robert Browning.

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Robert browning worldview truth is within ourselves
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